Courses

Below are just some of the courses associated with the Graduate Group in Nutritional Biology. Note that there are many other course options for the specific areas of specialization that you may take as part of completing your degree (these courses could be from a variety of departments, not just NUT and NUB).

Courses in Nutritional Biology (NUB)

NUB210A. Advanced Nutrition I: Nutrition and Metabolism, Macronutrients (5)

Lecture—4 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: admission to the Nutritional Biology Graduate Group or consent of instructor. Class size limited to 30 students. Advanced general nutritional concepts. Integrating nutrition with biological systems, population nutrition issues, and research approaches. Advanced concepts on lipid and protein metabolism.—I. (I.) Oteiza

NUB210C. Advanced Nutrition III: Nutrition in Health and Disease (5)

Lecture—4 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: admission to the Nutritional Biology Graduate Group or consent of instructor. Class size limited to 30 students. Integration of biochemical, physiological, and genetic aspects of nutrition in the context of clinical and epidemiological observations related to health and disease, including obesity and diabetes, cancer, vascular and neurodegenerative diseases, osteoporosis, and birth defects. Review and consideration of governmental.—III. (III.) Miller

NUB290C. Research Group Conference (1)

Discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Weekly conference on research problems, progress and techniques in animal sciences. May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.)—I, II, III. (I, II, III.)

NUB298. Directed Group Study (1-5)

Prerequisite: graduate standing in Nutritional Biology Graduate Group, or consent of instructor. May be repeated three times for credit when topics differs and consent of instructor.—I, II, III. (I, II, III.)

NUB299. Research (1-12)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.)—I, II, III. (I, II, III.)

Courses in Nutrition (NUT)

NUT201. Vitamin and Cofactor Metabolism (3)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: one upper division nutritional biochemistry and physiology course. Review of studies and relationships involving the metabolic functions of vitamins. Comparative nutritional aspects and the metabolism and chemistry of vitamins and vitamin-like compounds.

NUT202. Advanced Nutritional Energetics (2)

Lecture—2 hours. Prerequisite: Animal Biology 102, 103, Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior 101 or the equivalent. History of nutritional energetics. Evaluation of energy transformations associated with food utilization. Energy expenditures at cellular, tissue, and animal levels as affected by diet and physiological state. Current and future feeding systems.

NUT203. Advanced Protein and Amino Acid Nutrition (3)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: one upper division nutritional biochemistry and physiology course. Nutritional significance of protein and amino acids, including studies of the influence of dietary protein on digestion, absorption, metabolism, resistance to disease, and food intake. Study of dietary requirements and interrelationships among amino acids.

NUT204. Mineral Metabolism (2)

Lecture—2 hours. Prerequisite: upper division nutrition or biochemistry course. Studies of metabolic functions and nutritional interrelationships involving minerals.

NUT219A. International Nutrition (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing; undergraduates only admitted with consent of instructor after completion of course 111AV. Epidemiology, etiology, and consequences of undernutrition, with particular focus on the nutritional problems of children and women in low income populations. Offered in alternate years.—II. Dewey

NUT219B. International Nutrition (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 219A. Intervention programs to prevent or ameliorate nutritional problems in low-income populations. Planning, implementing, and evaluating nutrition intervention programs. Offered in alternate years.—III. Dewey

NUT230. Experiments in Nutrition: Design and Execution (2)

Laboratory—6 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor; courses 201, 202, 203, 204, or the equivalent recommended. Student selected projects to enhance laboratory skills. Independently, or in groups of two-three students, design a protocol, carry out the project, analyze the results and report the findings. May be repeated for credit up to six times (limit of three times per instructor) with consent of instructor.—I, II, III. (I, II, III.)

NUT250. Metabolic Homeostasis (3)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1.5 hours. Prerequisite: passing the Nutrition Graduate Group Preliminary Examination or consent of instructor. Preference given to students with advanced standing in the Nutrition Graduate Group. Regulatory mechanisms of carbohydrate, lipid, and protein homeostasis; mechanisms of metabolic enzyme regulation and of the metabolic hormones; homeostatic mechanisms and interactions; fuel-fuel interactions; nutrition energy balance.

NUT251. Nutrition and Immunity (2)

Lecture/discussion—2 hours. Prerequisite: Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology 126, Medical Microbiology 107 or the equivalent, Animal Biology 102. Cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying interactions of nutrition and immune function, including modulation of immunocompetence by diet and effects of immune responses on nutritional needs. Lectures and discussion explore implications for resistance to infection, autoimmunity and cancer. Offered in alternate years.—(II.) Klasing, Erickson, Stephensen

NUT252. Nutrition and Development (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: courses 201, 202, 203, 204. Relationship of nutrition to prenatal and early postnatal development.—II. (II.) Keen, Oteiza

NUT253. Control of Energy Balance and Body Weight (3)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 210A or 210B or consent of instructor. Comprehensive study of the biochemical, nutritional and physiological mechanisms controlling food intake, body composition and energy expenditure. Subject matter will be approached through lectures and discussions where students and staff will critically evaluate the literature. Offered in alternate years.—(III.) Havel, Ramsey

NUT254. Applications of Systems Analysis in Nutrition (3)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 202, Physiological Sciences 205A-205B or the equivalent. Quantitative aspects of digestion and metabolism; principles of systems analysis. Evolution of models of energy metabolism as applied in current feeding systems. Critical evaluations of mechanistic models used analytically in support of nutritional research. Offered in alternate years.

NUT257. Selected Topics in Nutritional and Hormonal Control of Nitrogen Metabolism (2)

Lecture—2 hours. Prerequisite: courses 201 through 204; Physiological Sciences 205A-205B or the equivalent. Quantitative and qualitative aspects of nitrogen metabolism; critical evaluation of dietary intake, hormones and diet-hormone interactions which affect nitrogen metabolism, including protein synthesis-degradation, amino acid synthesis-catabolism, nitrogen transport-excretion, depending on current literature. Offered in alternate years.

NUT258. Field Research Methods in International Nutrition (3)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Issues and problems related to implementation of nutrition field research in less-developed countries, including ethics; relationships with local governments, communities, and scientists; data collection techniques and quality assurance; field logistics; research budgets; and other administrative and personal issues. Offered in alternate years.—(II.) Dewey

NUT259. Nutrition and Aging (2)

Lecture—2 hours. Prerequisite: three of courses 201, 202, 203 and 204. Interaction between nutrition and aging. Topics include physiological/biochemical basis of aging, age-related changes affecting nutritional requirements, nutrition and mortality rate, assessment of nutritional status in the elderly, and relationship between developmental nutrition and the rate of aging. Offered in alternate years.

NUT260. Nutrition During Pregnancy (6)

Lecture—5 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: acceptance into the Master’s Degree program of Advanced Studies in Maternal and Child Nutrition. Overview of the anatomical, physiological and biochemical changes that occur during pregnancy and early development. Discussion and evaluation of nutritional/lifestyle factors associated with pregnancy outcomes and nutrition programs/interventions for pregnant women.—(I.) Heinig

NUT261. Lactation and Infant Nutrition (6)

Lecture—5 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 260. Overview of the physiological and biochemical processes underlying human lactation and nutritional needs of both mother and infant. Development of skills in assessment, nutrition counseling, education and support of new mothers and their families.—II. (II.) Heinig

NUT262. Child and Adolescent Nutrition (6)

Lecture—5 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 261. Relationships among nutrition, growth, and development during childhood and adolescence. Nutritional assessment for normal and high risk groups; psychological, social, and economic factors contributing to nutritional status. Nutritional needs and interventions for special groups, including obese children/adolescents, athletes, and eating disordered.—(III.) Heinig

NUT263. Applied Research Methods in Maternal and Child Nutrition (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: graduate standing; restricted to students enrolled in the MAS program and graduate students by consent of instructor. Application of epidemiological principles to the study of maternal and child nutrition. Topics include quantitative and qualitative study procedures, including study design, data collection, and related analytical techniques.—(I.) Heinig

NUT264A. Current Topics in Maternal and Child Nutrition: Principles of Adult Education (2)

Seminar—2 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing; restricted to students enrolled in the MAS program and graduate students by consent of instructor. Current scientific literature related to Maternal and Child Nutrition in adult education settings. Topics include methods and theories of adult education and critical thinking skills related to research evaluation.—II. Heinig

NUT264B. Current Topics in Maternal and Child Nutrition: Epidemiology and Evidence-Based Practice (2)

Seminar—2 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing; restricted to students enrolled in the MAS program and graduate students by consent of instructor. Current scientific literature related to Maternal and Child Nutrition. Topics include epidemiology, evidence-based practice, breast feeding promotion, and nutritional assessment of populations.—II. Heinig

NUT264C. Current Topics in Maternal and Child Nutrition: Public Policy Development and Implementation (2)

Seminar—2 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing; restricted to students enrolled in the MAS program and graduate students by consent of instructor. Current scientific literature related to Maternal and Child Nutrition. Topics include nutrition surveillance and monitoring, as well as public policy development and implementation.—III. Heinig

NUT270. Scientific Ethics in Biomedical Studies: Emphasis on Nutrition (3)

Lecture—1 hour; discussion—1 hour; term paper. Scientific ethics in biomedical studies, especially nutrition. Discussion and case study presentations on scientific integrity, fraud, misconduct, conflict of interest, human and animal research protections. Not open for credit to students who have completed course 492B.—Steinberg

NUT290. Beginning Nutrition Seminar (2)

Lecture/discussion—1 hour; seminar—1 hour. Prerequisite: first year graduate standing. Discussion and critical evaluation of topics in nutrition with emphasis on literature review and evaluation in this field. Students give oral presentations on relevant topics.—I. (I.)

NUT290C. Research Conference (1)

Discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: graduate standing and consent of instructor. Major professors lead research discussions with their graduate students. Research papers are reviewed and project proposals presented and evaluated. Format will combine seminar and discussion style. (S/U grading only.)—I, II, III. (I, II, III.)

NUT291. Advanced Nutrition Seminar (1)

Seminar—1 hour. Prerequisite: second-year graduate standing. Advanced topics in nutrition research. Multiple sections may be taken concurrently for credit. May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.)—I, II, III. (I, II, III.)

NUT293A. Current Topics in Obesity, Food Intake and Energy Balance (3)

Lecture—1 hour; seminar—1 hour; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: graduate standing or course 129. Undergraduates with upper division standing with at least one writing course may enroll with consent of instructor. Current research and its evaluation. Principles of experimental design and scientific background for given article. Articles summarized for posting on Internet for use by healthcare professionals. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

NUT293B. Current Topics in Obesity, Food Intake, and Energy Balance with Special Topics (3)

Lecture—1 hour; seminar—1 hour; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: graduate standing or course 129. Undergraduates with upper division standing with at least one writing course may enroll with consent of instructor. A continuation of course 293A, with additional special topics. May be repeated for credit up to 3 times with consent of instructor.

NUT294A. Current Topics in Developmental Nutrition (2)

Seminar—2 hours. Prerequisite: course 114 or 252 or consent of instructor. Effects of nutrition on embryology, morphogenesis, and developmental mechanisms. May be repeated for credit when topic differs.—I. (I.)

NUT297T. Supervised Teaching in Nutrition (1-3)

Teaching under faculty supervision—3-9 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing in nutrition or consent of instructor. Practical experience in teaching nutrition at the university level; curriculum design and evaluation; preparation and presentation of material. Assistance in laboratories, discussion sections, and evaluation of student work. (S/U grading only.)

NUT298. Group Study (1-5)

NUT299. Research (1-12)

(S/U grading only.)

Professional

NUT492A. Professionalism: An Academic Perspective (2)

Lecture/discussion—2 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing. For graduate students in their initial quarter of residence. Professionalism topics are presented and examples drawn from both the biological and social sciences.

NUT492C. Grant Writing (3)

Lecture—1.5 hours; discussion—1.5 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing in Nutrition or consent of instructor. Preparation of grants for governmental agencies (particularly NIH and USDA) and private foundations. Students will write a research grant or fellowship application. May be repeated one time for credit with consent of instructor. Offered in alternate years.

BCM209. Prostaglandins/Leukotrienes and Related Lipids (2)

Lecture—2 hours. Prerequisite: Biochemistry 101A-101B or Physiological Sciences 101A-101B or Physiology 100A-100B. Oxidative desaturation/elongation of poyunsaturated fatty acids. Biosynthesis of prostaglandins/leukotrienes from polyunsaturated fatty acids. Chemistry, biochemistry, and metabolism. Nutritional regulation. Physiological/pathophysiological implications; pharmacological and clinical relevance. Offered in alternate years.—(II.) Ziboh